Ghosts of Shopping Past

Kentucky Fried Chicken, 2009

Kentucky Fried Chicken, 2009

A few weeks ago, Nozlee Samadzadeh of the The Morning News posted an interview and some recent work of the ongoing Dark Stores, Ghostboxes and Dead Malls. I’ve been traveling quite a bit, retreating back to Chicago to edit, research and head back out again. It’s been a constructive time and I’m excited that the work is beginning to really take me into some interesting directions (even into sculptures, found objects, etc).
The article on the Morning News website really took off and  I couldn’t be more tickled to see it needle its way across the internet and all the while retaining the context with quotes from the interview, in addition to spawning some interesting discussions itself.
Here’s a few of the other sites the article was reposted:

http://www.coolhunting.com/archives/2009/12/ghosts_of_shopp.php
http://www.boingboing.net/2009/12/11/haunting-dead-mall-p.html
http://www.core77.com/blog/object_culture/the_ghosts_of_shopping_past_abandoned_malls_and_big-box_stores_15488.asp
http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/ghosts-of-shopping-past
Even better to see some good intelligent discourse spawned from the original article. My favorite here:
http://archaeopop.blogspot.com/2009/12/eulogy-for-american-mall.html
“If archaeology is about the intersection of space and material culture, then the shopping mall is ground zero for an archaeological understanding of the 20th century in America, a time and place that was pivotal in world history. What Ulrich suggests above is a transformation in the spatial organization of consumption – zoning for quality retail rather than growth at any cost. In other words, he’s suggesting we start a new cultural horizon.”

Coolhunting
Boing Boing
Core 77
Trendhunter

One of my favorite discussions here:
Archaepop

“If archaeology is about the intersection of space and material culture, then the shopping mall is ground zero for an archaeological understanding of the 20th century in America, a time and place that was pivotal in world history. What Ulrich suggests above is a transformation in the spatial organization of consumption – zoning for quality retail rather than growth at any cost. In other words, he’s suggesting we start a new cultural horizon.”

New cultural horizon indeed. Here’s to 2010!

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